Pixelated Posts: The Ravager

Next up in our sneak-peeks for our upcoming not-so-secret game is the Ravager! Bullish and stubborn, the Ravager has the strength of ten men and the patience of precisely none of them. Once he sets his mind to something, he intends to see it done come hell or high water. Armed with nothing other than his great-axe, the Ravager is a terrible force to behold on the battlefield.

Sigil Bestiary: The Mage

In this bestiary post, we’ll look at the arcane masters of the universe: the Mages. Filled with mysterious knowledge that no man should know, these magical scholars can be powerful allies and dangerous enemies. They can bend the universe to their whim, and reshape reality as they see fit.

Combat30Social60
Explore50Mental80
P. Wounds6M. Wounds16

Perk: Prestigidation: The GM can spend one of his Sigils for the scene so that the Mage can alter and shape reality in one small, but meaningful, way.

Quirk: Fel-Magic: Whenever the Mage fails a Mental Check to cast a spell or use a supernatural power, he becomes corrupted by the dark powers. This includes a Mental Wound as well as a permanent aesthetic change equal in severity to the Mental Wound suffered.

In terms of equipment, the Mage doesn’t wear any armour as he trusts his arcane arts to protect him (and some Mages feel that armour gets in the way of using their magical abilities). For weapons, he carries with him his trusty Staff (a two-handed Medium Melee Weapon, -10 to hit, +20 damage) as well as his Magic Wand (a Medium Ranged Weapon with Medium Damage, +20 damage). The Wand requires no ammunition as it is the Mage’s raw willpower which is flung at the enemy.


And there you have it, the Mage is all his magical majesty. Next time on the bestiary we will look at an NPC you will be able to find exploring the wilderness.

Sigil Bestiary

We’re starting a new blog series today: the Sigil Bestiary! In each blog post, we’ll show you one (or two if we’re feeling fancy) enemies/opponents/monsters that you can encounter and overcome in the Sigil System. All in all there are a 100 entries in the Sigil Bestiary, and once this blog series is done, we’ll compile them all into a mod for the Sigil System and release it as a snazzy-looking pdf.

Bestiary Stats

Each opponent in the Bestiary will come with four Skills, one Perk, one Quirk, a set number of Wounds and then some Equipment. The four Skills condense the twenty regular Sigil System Skills into something easier to manage for the GM, especially when dealing with many NPCs. Each Bestiary Skill can be thought of as a Skill Group, and anytime you’d roll for a Skill within that group, you just roll the Bestiary Skill instead. Here’s how the Bestiary Skills and Sigil System Skills match up:

CombatExploreSocialMental
FightPerceptionDeceiveLogic
ShootInvestigateDiplomacyWill
AthleticsStealthIntimidateSpecial
ConstitutionDriveIntuitionFine-Craft
MightBurglaryWealthBroad-Craft

Opponents in the Bestiary also don’t have Hit Locations unless the GM wants to make combat deadlier and more formidable for the players. Unless stated otherwise, treat each opponent as just having one Hit Location for their entire body.

The brutish Orcs

So with that out of the way, the first opponent to show off to you is the Orc, that quintessential RPG enemy. Orcs are the antithesis of all that is good about humanity. They are brutish, savage creature that love nothing more than death and destruction. The only things they manage to create is misery and fear, and so it is up to eliminate the hordes of Orcs from the face of the world.

Combat60Social25
Explore50Mental25
P. Wounds4M. Wounds2

Perk: Cannibal: The Orc can eat the flesh of another sentient creature to heal a Wound of equal or lesser severity as the amount of flesh consumed.

Quirk: Rage: In combat, the Orc must use his whole turn to attack the closest enemy or to move towards the closest enemy, unless the GM spends a Sigil each turn.

In terms of equipment, Orcs come with scavenged, ill-fitting, and ill-maintained armour granting them an armour value of only 5. For weapons, Orcs come in three varieties. You can have him wielding only a two-handed Heavy Melee Weapon (-30 to hit, but +15 damage); a one-handed Medium Melee Weapon (-20 to hit, +10 damage) and a shield worth 15 armour; or a Medium Ranged Weapon with Medium damage (+10) and a light Melee Weapon (-10 to hit, +5 damage).


And there you have it, the Orc is all his murderous and evil glory. In the next blog post we’ll show something a little calmer, and not fit merely for a combat encounter.

Playing Sigil Solo: NPCs

Whether you’re stuck in a lockdown or social distancing, or you don’t have a game coming up soon and you need to scratch that RPG itch, you can always play an RPG singleplayer.

In this series we’ll be taking you through how to play the Sigil System as a singleplayer-RPG, and last time we gave you the basics and the two golden rules.

This time we’re talking about NPCs and how to give them some flavour.

Friends & Strangers

This post will be all about how to add some randomisation to NPCs in order to keep them unique and surprising to you as the player (while simultaneously being the GM). Remember that you don’t have to randomise each and every NPC you come into contact with; the tables below are only tools to help you if you get stuck with coming up with an NPC’s traits or personality or if you want to add in a bit of uncertainty to the social encounter to keep you on your toes. You are, after all, the storyteller and should use these tools so they best fit the story.

Attitudes & Goals

Not every NPC you meet will be your best friend, willing to divulge every secret they have and opt to join you in any quest you want, and nor should they. Most NPCs, like most people in life, will be entirely neutral and apathetic to your existence, and some others may not particularly like you. The NPC’s Attitude towards you will set the tone for the rest of your interaction with them, and this little table helps to set that Attitude.

RollAttitude
1-5Hostile
6-16Unfriendly
17-35Cold
36-65Neutral
66-84Warm
85-95Friendly
96-100Loving

And no matter who you meet, they will have some goal they are trying to achieve. It doesn’t have to be life dream or worldly aspiration, but in most cases will just be the thing they are currently wanting or in need of. What they want will affect how they treat you, so a change in their current goal will change everything about your social interaction with them.

RollCurrent Goal/Need
1-5 Acquire more wealth
5-10 Artistic pursuits
11-15 Basic needs (hunger, thirst, sleep)
16-20 Chase/find something
21-25 Fame and recognition
26-30 Fill a spiritual hole
31-35 Friendship, companionship
36-40 Gain knowledge/wisdom
41-45 Inflict harm
46-50 Instant gratification
51-55 Philanthropy/charity
56-60 Protect/care for someone
61-65 Respect and appreciation
66-70 Rest and relaxation
71-75 Right a wrong
76-80 Romantic intimacy
81-85 Running from something
86-90 Send a message
91-95 Start/continue a project
96-100 Take what others have

The NPCs’ current goals are intentionally vague so that they can fit with most circumstances and so that you can flavour them that best fits the narrative.

Personality & Emotions

If you are in a bind and can’t think of what personality an NPC should have, or have to get a lot of NPCs in short order, we have a couple of d100 tables that can help.

Rather than fill the rest of this blog post with 200 rows of tables, here’s a neat pdf that you can check out instead. For both tables you can just roll a d100 and match your roll to the result to get an answer.

The first table will show you what the NPCs current emotional state is. Are they happy, sad, angry, etc? What emotion they have will dictate how they respond to your character, and may make it easier or harder to work with them.

The second table is for their personality. Are they the whimsical sort, or more of a grim figure; blunt and boisterous, or sophisticated and solemn. This table will add a lot of flavour to the NPCs you encounter and give them that unique surprise that comes from player a regular RPG.


That’s it for this blog post about playing the Sigil System as a singleplayer-RPG. Take all these tools together with the 2 Golden Rules from the last post, and you will have everything you need to play any social encounter you can think of.

In the meantime, if you want to chat with us and other Stormforge fans, come join our Discord server!

Sigil System 1.4 Released

The Sigil System 1.4 is now available for download!

The major addition to 1.4 is the Downtime rules, which you can find starting on page 37.

Downtime is that space in-between adventures where you can slow down, take a breather, and get to work on some things you’ve had in mind. It’s also a grand way to advance time in the game, and also to park one character for a bit, while you take another one out for an adventure.

Downtime comes in 3 parts: Work, Live, and Play. 

Work is self-explanatory in that you need to be making some money so you can spend it in the rest of Downtime. Each type of job in Downtime has some Skills associated with it, and you need to beat a Skill Check to get into the job, so your current Skill Levels will in part determine what sort of job you can get. You can, of course, choose not to have a job and then you’ll have extra time to spend doing what you want (but it does come at a cost though).

Live is where you choose your level of lifestyle for Downtime. How comfortable do you want to live versus how much can you afford. Your chosen level of lifestyle will affect the flavour of all the activities you choose to do during Downtime, and can be a benefit or hindrance in many of them.

Speaking of activities, Play is where you get to choose what you want to do for the Downtime. You can go out and socialise, start a crafting project, do some research, train your skills, rest and recuperate and many more. 

Everything you do during downtime will have some sort of reward, be it money, information, or Skill Levels. So your character won’t just be sitting idle when away from an adventure.


If you don’t already have your hands on the Sigil System, you can grab it HERE from DrivethruRPG or HERE from itch.io.

The Sigil Story Journal

We are always working to make the Sigil System better and better. Perfection can never be attained, but we will damn well get close to it. And as of today, the Sigil System is one step closer to that point than it was yesterday.

Introducing the Sigil Story Journal!

The Story Journal is a quick and easy way to capture the essence of each game session, so you can come back to it later to remember and revisit what happened. There’s sections for each part of the session’s events, so you can just go through the template, fill out all the bits and Bob’s your uncle.

Each session gets its own page, so the longer your campaign goes on for, the more of a book you’ll have by the end of it. And the best part is that you can come back to any point in time in the campaign to see exactly what happened where, when, and to whom.

Getting a new player on board an existing campaign has never been as easy. You just give them the journal and they’ll be right up to speed with what’s going on.


The Sigil Story Journal is part of the files you get when you download the Sigil System, so CLICK HERE to get your hands on the whole Sigil bundle of goodies.

Sigil Casino Games: d100 Baccarat

It’s been a while since our last Sigil Casino post, but we’re back to show off a card game almost as popular in casinos as poker and blackjack: Baccarat.

Baccarat

For the uninitiated, Baccarat has deceptively simple rules. Each player gets dealt two cards and adds up the numbers on the cards. The closest to 9 wins. If you are below 9, you can always ask for a third and final card. If you happen to go over 9 then you just take the second digit of the number (so a 12 becomes a 2). And lastly, face cards count as a 0.

And that’s all there is to it. That’s Baccarat. So let’s put that into Sigil terms.

d100 Baccarat

Each game of Baccarat starts with every player putting down their bets. Then each one rolls 2d10 and add together the numbers (treat all 10s as 0s). Anyone who rolled 8 or over stays on their number, anyone below that can choose to roll one more d10 to add to their total. If you result is over 1, then take the second digit of the number (so a 12 becomes a 2).

If any player got a 9, then they win automatically, otherwise it is the player who got the closest to 9. If there is a draw, then they split the pot. See, simple as that.

Punto Banco

Punto Banco is a version of Baccarat played against the casino (called the Banker). The banker deals two hands, one for himself and one for the player, and the player can bet on either one. The main difference between casual Baccarat and Punto Banco is getting that third card/d10.

If either the player or banker gets an 8 or a 9, then the round ends immediately.

If the player got a 6-7, then he stands and doesn’t get a third d10. The player only rolls a third d10 if he gets a 0-5.

If the player only has two cards, then the Banker plays by the same rules as the player (stands on a 6-7, gets a third d10 on a 0-5). However, if the player rolled a third d10, then the banker consults the following options based on what his total is:

  • If the total is 2 or less, then the banker rolls a third d10, regardless of what the player’s third d10 is.
  • If the total is 3, then the banker rolls a third d10 unless the player’s third d10 was an 8.
  • If the total is 4, then the banker rolls a third d10 if the player’s third d10 was 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.
  • If the total is 5, then the banker rolls a third d10 if the player’s third d10 was 4, 5, 6, or 7.
  • If the total is 6, then the banker rolls a third d10 if the player’s third d10 was a 6 or 7.
  • If the total is 7, then the banker stands.

Not as simple, but it is the most famous version of Baccarat played in casinos.

Betting

Betting in the Sigil System works by using “points” of your character’s Wealth Skill Level. If you win, you gain a bonus to your Wealth Skill Check equal to the amount of points you’ve won until such a time as your GM decides you have used up all of your winnings (at least for 1 session). Similarly, you won’t lose any levels in your Wealth Skill if you lose a bet, but you will take a penalty to any Wealth Skill Checks equal to the amount of points your lost.

You can bet as many points of Wealth up to your character’s Wealth Skill Level plus any points you have already won. Other characters can “spot” you some money by taking a penalty to their Wealth Skill Checks, and you will gain some “points” to bet with.

Enforcer in progress

ENFORCER, our INQ28 game is coming along stunningly. We’re already getting it on InDesign and getting the layout sorted, and we are busy getting the cover art done.

enforcer layout

So expect to see ENFORCER out soon on DriveThruRPG very soon alongside our other projects. In the mean time, if you want to see how the draft rules for ENFORCER looks like, come join our Discord server and have a look.