Magic Mondays – Long Shot

This week for Magic Mondays we bring you an array for those hard to reach areas..

This week we show you the Long Shot array.

Notation: Top array: Create a Containment Field that excludes Air if Air is present.

Bottom array: Float Lead if Air is not present.

Description: This is one of the few blatantly offensive arrays that use two arrays working together to accomplish one task. This is something more often seen with utility arrays, where one needs a degree of specificity not commonly seen in offensive arrays, but the Long Shot does one thing only and it does it very well and for that it needs two arrays.

To understand its purpose and the need for two arrays, one must first understand its intended application. Unlike many other offensive arrays that can be used with musket rounds, arrows, bolts, swords, knives, axes and everything in between, the Long Shot was specifically intended only for musket, pistol and, more rarely, cannon rounds and its effectiveness beyond these are little to none.

Now, knowing what these arrays are intended for, along with its quite unsubtle name, it is easy to work out what the Long Shot does: it makes firearm rounds travel further and faster. One can argue that this is a immensely mundane use of an offensive array, especially when compared to some of the gruesome and grisly arrays often applied to weapons, however it all comes back to the specificity of why these arrays were designed. The Long Shot is mostly used in war where being able to kill the enemy before they can fire back is always a good thing, however it has found its home in the dark streets of Middelburg by snipers who know that every metre they can gain on a shot is worth its weight in orichalcum.

Both arrays work towards its goal of carrying the fired round further. The top array does so by destroying the air around it, lowering the air pressure (and thus wind resistance) around the fired round to near nothing. The bottom array (inscribed backwards onto the round so that the runes face inward) removes the effects of gravity on the round and allows it to float freely in the vacuum caused by the top array.

While it may be simpler for the top array to just create a ever-present containment field that excludes air, rather than making the field only when air is present in order to destroy it, but all this will do is have the wind resistance focused around the containment field rather than the round. It won’t get rid of the air resistance. By putting in the If-Then statement, the array destroys the air before it reaches the round, creating a near vacuum.

The reason why the bottom array only Floats the round when no air is present is the same as with any array with an If-Then statement: so that the array can store energy before being shot.

Eventually both arrays will run out of energy and the fired round will succumb to air and gravity and fall to the ground, but with the Long Shot a round can easily travel twice as far as normal.

If you want to get more arrays, check out our Journal of Array Design over on DriveThruRPG, now also available as a deck of magic cards.

Magic Mondays

This week for Magic Mondays we bring you a defensive array that is sure to cover all bases.

This week we show you the Imperial Zephyr array.

Notation: Transmute Copper, Cold, Iron, Lead, Tin, Silver, Wood, Fire, Stone and Water into Air.

Description: Simple and straightforward, as all the old arrays are. And just as they simple and straightforward, so are they reliable and that is why they are still in use.

The Imperial Zephyr is to the Heavenly Empire of Man as the Middelburg Standard is to Alfresia; it is the most widely used defensive array in that nation, so much so that the Zephyr is the first array an Imperial will think of when thinks of defensive arrays. Take a Middelburg Standard to the Empire and they will all look at you strangely and ask why you would want to change such a proven and effective array as the Zephyr. A defensive Alfresian might reply in that the Standard is a safer and more reliable alternative, but what would that do against more than a millennium of tradition?

While it is true that the Standard is safer than the Zephyr, and one can argue that in the long term more reliable, to the Imperials (and those others who use the Zephyr) it becomes a question of energy. As all elementary rune scribes are taught, “A properly draughted array is one hundred percent efficient”, this is only half the equation. This is because an array can only output as much energy as the input it received. Wanting to create a flame but only inputted 1000 Joules of energy? Well then you will only get 1000 Joules worth of fire and not a Joule more.

A containment field steps around this problem because it does not truly exist. A containment field requires no energy at all to be created because it does not in any material sense exist. However, once it comes into contact with a material that it needs to contain or exclude, then it requires energy and it requires as much energy as would be needed to hold something in, keep something out, or obliterate something wholesale. In this way, the Standard requires no energy to be activated, but does require energy after it has been hit. “Product first, payment second” it could be said.

This can be risky as a containment field already activated, but without enough energy stop, for example, a musket round may deactivate halfway through stopping that round and not activate quickly enough to completely stop it, resulting in a potentially fatal wound for whomever is wearing the Middelburg Standard.

This is, the Imperials argue, where the Zephyr is a better array. By transmuting whatever hits it, it is a “Payment first, product second” type of array. It requires enough energy to transmute whatever hit it into air before it can activate. This is argued to be the more reliable method as most everything is more dense than air and so it takes less energy to transmute, for example, lead into air as it does air into lead. Theoretically, the Imperials argue, this means the array should never encounter a problem with energy usage.

The Alfresians argue that keeping up a containment barrier before being hit is far safer because the Zephyr requires energy input (nearly always in the form of being hit by something) before it can activate. Keep in mind that an array does not absorb energy, it translates it. This means that it creates a copy of the energy for its own use. This means that if something were to hit the Zephyr, the array would only transmute the material once it has gained enough energy. However, that energy is kinetic energy that the person wearing the Zephyr would feel. A hit too hard, too quickly, could potentially still kill the person even as the Zephyr transmutes it.

Who is right? Who is wrong? A question for the ages.

If you want to get more arrays, check out our Journal of Array Design over on DriveThruRPG, now also available as a deck of magic cards.

The Ruined Souls

The Ruined City, is more than just a campaign, more than a series of adventures. It is a the beginning of a tale of humanity; of what we are when no one is looking; of how we behave in time of crises and panic; of our resilience, our kindness, our brutality and our empathy. In short, The Ruined City the start of a tale about our character.

And so, what better way to celebrate the ruined character of humanity than with a ruined character with which to explore the streets of Middelburg. So for the next few weeks we will be giving you some pre-made characters tailored to the Ruined City that you can use when playing. Within each PDF document you will find a character sheet, a history and description of the character as well as what equipment they wear, what arrays they use, what persons are of interest in their lives and even their motives during the adventure. In short, you will have everything you need to simply pick up and play The Ruined City.

Up this week is Amelie Schneider, the wrathful nun who has gone from healing the sick and preaching scripture to running in dark alleyways for all manners of criminality…

Download her character pack here.

Magic Mondays

This week for Magic Mondays we bring you another array that is ubiquitous and yet invisible.

This week we show you the Firestarter array.

Notation: Create and Sustain a Fire if Wood is not present and Contain that Fire to the boundary of the array.

Description: A wise man once said that the greatest of magics could be found in the most mundane aspects of life and, like most idioms and sayings, it is truer than we would like to think. One could talk all day about the immeasurable work that goes into hand crafting a single glass, or all the inventions that were needed before our homes were so comfortably heated that we never give it a second’s thought. But this is about arrays, not engineering, so let’s take for example the Firestarter array.

There is not a single gentleman in Middelburg that has a Firestarter array more than a minute’s frantic search away from him. Most men keep one tidily tucked away in a pocket and ask any barkeep, or even a priest and they would be quick to produce one. This is not because most men in Middelburg are raving arsonists, but rather that the Firestarter array is used to light pipes, hookahs, candles and even a stubborn hearth or two.

A firestarter, the contraption not the array, is a small wooden cylinder with hinged wooden cap that can be tightly closed. On top of the cylinder, and enclosed by the cap, is the Firestarter array. Needless to say, that is all there is to this array. Flick open the cap, and the array is activated, creating a small and manageable flame. Close the cap and the presence of the wood will deactivate the array. Because of this If-Then statement, the array absorbs energy throughout the day while it is not in use and then expends it when it is. The movement inside a man’s pocket is more than enough to charge an array that you only need for a few seconds at a time.

Of course, a firestarter can be made of many materials and the wealthier a man becomes, the richer his firestarter. When this is the case, the Wood rune in the centre is simply replaced by whatever material the firestarter’s cap is made from.

If you want to get more arrays, check out our Journal of Array Design over on DriveThruRPG, now also available as a deck of magic cards.

Magic Mondays

This week for Magic Mondays we bring you an icy array that will help get you out of tight spots.

This week we show you the Ice Bomb array.

Notation: Create Water in an area 200 times the size of the array and Cool it at a rate of 64 Degrees Celsius per second if either Wood or Stone is present.

Description: If you think this array looks and sounds anything like the Sound Bomb or Smoke Bomb arrays, then you are right on the money. The Ice Bomb array is another variation of “let’s inscribe an array on small metal balls and throw them around” type of array that seems to work so well in the cramped streets of Middelburg. And the cramped streets of Middelburg is exactly why this type of array works so well: when you don’t have much space in which to manoeuvre then whoever controls that space will undoubtedly walk away from the fight with (most of) his limbs intact.

This array works very simply: it creates a lot of water and then near-instantly freezes it. Unlike the Ice Stone array, this one is not designed to trap opponents (although no one will be unhappy should that eventuate), instead the Ice Bomb is meant to obstruct and impede your opponents. If the array is only 1cm across then the chunk of ice it will produce will be 2 metres in diameter. No imagine throwing half a dozen of these behind you in a cramped alleyway as you are running away from your pursuers (we would hate to imply the constables); the entire alleyway would be filled with rock hard ice that your pursuers will now have to clamber and scrabble over if they want to reach you. You on the other hand have all the time in the world now to make your escape.

One design feature to note with this array is to show you that you can combine If-Then statements and share them between two different loci. As you can see, both the Create and the Cool loci share an If-Then statement. It would make no difference to the effect of the array if you were to give them their own one each, however it will save you time and effort were you to simply combine them.

If you want to get more arrays, check out our Journal of Array Design over on DriveThruRPG, now also available as a deck of magic cards.

Magic Mondays

This week for Magic Mondays we bring you a masterclass in runic array design.

This week we show you the Aspect of Woudas array.

Notation: Apply the effect of a Created, Sustained Fire that excludes Heat onto Humans within an area 100 times greater than the area of the array.

Description: The Aspect of Woudas array is an instructional array far more than it is a practically useful array. After all, how many times will you need to encase people in fire that don’t give off heat? However, what it can do it show folks how you can use complex arrays in order to achieve a goal you may not have thought possible. It also serves a secondary purpose in that it can be used as a template for other complex arrays you might have in mind.

The key thing to remember about complex arrays is that the secondary array (the one inside the main array) takes the place of any normal rune in a locus and is treated as such. This means that you can use other runes to affect or even modify the secondary array. Here we used a Contain and Gargantuan rune to specify the size over which the effect must happen, but you could easily have used size runes to modify (rather than affect) the secondary array to increase or decrease the amount of fire you wanted, or time runes to speed up or slow down the flames. You could even have been much ambitious and use a Transmute rune to transmute a material(s) into the entire effect.

The bottom line is that if you can do it with a normal rune in a normal locus, you can do it with a secondary array.

The other useful thing to remember is that it is the effect of a secondary array that is affecting the centrum (or other locus), not the runes inside. In other words, work out what the secondary array does and then apply that to what it is affecting. In this case, the secondary array creates an continuous fire that produces no heat. So if you apply that to humans, it means that all humans within the area specified by the array are on fire but the flames produce no heat. This is important, because if it were the runes and not the effect that affected the humans in the array’s area then the Create, Sustain and Exclude Heat would all have been applied to humans which would have meant this array created frozen human popsicles.

Lastly for this little masterclass, you can swap out the secondary array here for any array you want and have the array do all sorts of things. Arrays are, by their very nature, quite flexible, so the only limit is your imagination.

If you want to get more arrays, check out our Journal of Array Design over on DriveThruRPG, now also available as a deck of magic cards.

Magic Mondays

This week for Magic Mondays we bring you a defensive array that promises to always deliver right on time.

This week we show you the Steel Dragon array.

Notation: Transmute Copper, Gold, Iron, Lead, Silver, Tin and Wood into a disk of Iron with twice the area size of the array and with a depth 1/10th that of the array’s diameter. Pull this disk towards the array at a speed of 1m/s and Sustain this Pulling.

Description: “Protection when you need it, only when you need, every time you need it,” was the marketing phrase the Uttosians used when they brought the Steel Dragon across the eastern ocean to Alfresia. Using the runes to fashion this type of array was entirely unorthodox according the Alfresians, who preferred something more reliable and rather less tangible than steel plates protecting them from incoming musket fire. There is a reason why the Middelburg Standard is the most used defensive array in the city. After all, what can penetrate an impenetrable force field?

“Whatever the arrays do not specify,” was the Uttosians answer to that rhetorical question, and suddenly the Alfresians weren’t so stalwartly sure about their tried and true array. It is undoubtedly true that the Middelburg Standard, as all such arrays do, only stops materials which are specified by the runes in its array. Ice, for example is not specified and that is why, to this day, “ice knives” are (seldom) used in assassinations. What the array makes up for in simplicity, it loses out in flexibility.

“Dragons are as flexible as they are strong!” the Uttosians claimed when they heard of this revelation by the Alfresians, and there is some merit and truth in their propaganda. The Steel Dragon does create the steel disks (or Dragon Scales) only when confronted by the materials listed, similarly to the Middelburg Standard‘s force field it is true, but that scale is then held against the array by any lingering energy, ready to intercept any impact from any sort of material. Once it has been primed, it leaves behind a set of armour ready to defend its wearer.

To increase the flexibility of this array, the Uttosians who venture into Middelburg often carry pouches of gold dust with them. If ever confronted with an enemy, they simply have to reach into their pouch and cover themselves with the dust and like a parlour trick, they will suddenly have become encased in a set of dragon scale armour! There is a reason why the Middelburg footmen call the bodyguards of Uttosian diplomats Wyrms, because like the fabled creature they can suddenly appear in flash of golden light to rip apart the unwary.

If you want to get more arrays, check out our Journal of Array Design over on DriveThruRPG, now also available as a deck of magic cards.

Magic Mondays

For Magic Mondays this week we give you an array that could quite literally save you in the nick of time.

This week we show you the Time Saver array.

Notation: Stop Time, in an area as wide across as the array with a depth one tenth the array’s diameter, if Fire, Iron, Wood, Gold, Silver, Lead, Tin or Copper is present.

Description: They say that time is a thief that steals from us everything we love. Every heartfelt moment of joy, gladness, love or sadness is snatched away by time. Our youth, our vigour, our strength is all stolen by time. And even our friends and loved ones will be taken, one by one, by time until he comes to take our very lives. For something so cruel, yet so powerful, it seemed only fitting that man himself bring time to heel and force time to save what it also takes.

The Time Saver array, other than being a pretty exercise in radial symmetry, works in a straightforward manner, but as we have come to learn about the runes and arrays, it is not in their design and function but in their application that they truly come into their own as ingenious tools for survival and profit.

This array works by stopping time if it senses any of the four materials. That’s it. The trick here, though, is that by creating eight functions in the array that do precisely the same thing but with different If-Then triggers, we create a situation best described as “stop time If this Or that” where if we simply had one function with all eight triggers it would have been “stop time If this And that And the other thing”. Laying out the functions in this manner give this defensive array a much greater flexibility.

This array is most commonly seen on bucklers and shields where it can be expertly wielded to target incoming musket and pistol rounds and melee weapons; however the skilled at heart and deft at hands could of course wear this on their clothing, they had best be careful not to accidentally stop time in any part of their body they wish to keep.

While stopping time would indeed stop any round, arrow, blade or cudgel coming your way, logically they would continue on their path was this effect wore off. This is why you should be quick on your feet if you choose to use this array as it will only give you a few seconds at best to move out of the way before the energy in the array wears off. This few seconds should be all the time you need, though, to turn the tables on your opponents. A blade aimed at you that is now suddenly frozen in midair will surprise the most cynical of killers, if only for a heartbeat, but that is all the time you need to end the fight. Similarly, a musket round caught in midair in front of your chest can easily be sent on its way once you’ve stepped aside, and if you managed to position yourself between two opponents then they have done the job for you.

The Time Saver array requires a lot of skill to be used properly, but the rewards are well worth the time put in.

If you want to get more arrays, check out our Journal of Array Design over on DriveThruRPG, now also available as a deck of magic cards.

Magic Mondays

This week for Magic Mondays we give you an array to control the battlefield!

This week we give you the Icestone array.

Notation: Transmute Stone to Water if Stone is present and Cool Water at a rate of 16 degrees Centigrade per second.

Description: A wise man once said that if you can control the field upon which you fight, then you cannot lose that battle. This is as true whether you are in a pitched battle on open ground during a grand war, or in a dirty back-alley fight in the cramped, darkened alleyways of Middelburg. This because more often than not, it isn’t your blade or your firearm which is your greatest weapon, but the environment itself and your ability to manipulate it.

The Icestone is fairly straightforward array that exemplifies the runes arrays’ capability to be used in a variety of situations. The Icestone changes stone/earth/soil into water and then freezes that water. You might not think that is anything special, but its the use of this array that makes it so. The Icestone is meant to be inscribed on small metal balls just like the Smoke Bomb and Sound Bomb arrays. Because of the If-Then statement in the array, the Icestone can gather more than enough energy before you throw the metal ball and it releases all of that at once.

While you can throw it at any piece of stone or ground that you like, the purpose of this array is to be thrown under the feet of your opponents. There it will transmute the stone to water, causing your opponent to fall into it, and then it will freeze the water, holding your opponent tightly so he can’t move. It’s a simple and effective way of getting an opponent out of combat without killing him, or keeping an opponent stationary so that a sharpshooter can get a better aim at him. You can even throw a bunch of these at once towards a group of people to instantly make sure they no longer trouble you.

Sometimes the best way to defeat your opponent is not to attack him directly.

If you want to get more arrays, check out our Journal of Array Design over on DriveThruRPG, now also available as a deck of magic cards.

Quest Giver Fridays

The Ruined City, is an excellent campaign and a great source of adventures, both randomly encountered and planned, however there are far more to the The Runed Age and the Grand City of Middelburg than just one campaign. And so we will be giving you Quest Giver Fridays, where we take one of the many factions in Middelburg and adjust the Adventure Generator in the Runed Age Corebook to them to give you more varied and unique missions and jobs to do in the city.

Up this week are the organisations that deal with exploration and learning! That’s right, life in the dark streets of Middelburg is not just all about killing and dying, or about who has the biggest rifle or sharpest blade. No, sometimes there is a lot to be learned on the streets of Middelburg, that is, if you know where to look.

There is a simple rule in Middelburg: eventually, everyone needs a criminal. Whether it is, as we’ve seen in the past few weeks, the temples, the constables or even the university and museum, eventually everyone needs to do something that may not be 100% legal, moral or ethical, or they simply want to make sure no one hears about it. So when that day comes, even the most noble, the most educated among the city’s population will turn to footmen to get the job done.

That is not to say that you will be getting the same kind of jobs from these vaunted institutions as you would from, say, the Merchant League. The sort of jobs you’ll get from these organisations of exploration and learning are far tamer than the dangerous streets of Middelburg and may simply just involve sending you out to explore some ruins, chart a new map somewhere or even deliver a priceless antique. But while the jobs may appear safer, remember that for scholars, the pursuit of knowledge is its own reward and that means you may end up poorer at the end of a mission than when you started.

The four coat of arms are (from left to right): The Alfresian Guild of Gentlemanly Explorers, The University of Middelburg, The Most Noble Order of Knights of the Seal Lion, and the Alfresian Museum of Natural History. If you want to know more about them, all of these factions are described and discussed in The Runed Age Corebook and The Ruined Adventure Books that you can get from DriveThruRPG.

Magic Mondays

For Magic Mondays this week we don’t have an array to show you. Instead we have ALL the arrays to show you. Earlier this year we released the Journal of Array Design for free on DriveThruRPG. We collected and curated all the runic arrays we had released up until that point in one free PDF for you to easily use while you’re gaming.

We took that philosophy one step further and turned all our arrays into a deck of cards. On one side is the array itself while on the reverse is the name and notation so that you will know which array you are using and what it does. Just like in the Journal, the cards are colour coded so that you can quickly sort like with like. Red is for offensive arrays, blue for defensive and green for utility.

The physical proofs just arrived and as soon as we made 100% sure they came out perfectly from the printers, they’ll go on sale on DriveThruRPG! So watch this space.

Quest Giver Friday

The Ruined City, is an excellent campaign and a great source of adventures, both randomly encountered and planned, however there are far more to the The Runed Age and the Grand City of Middelburg than just one campaign. And so we will be giving you Quest Giver Fridays, where we take one of the many factions in Middelburg and adjust the Adventure Generator in the Runed Age Corebook to them to give you more varied and unique missions and jobs to do in the city.

Up this week are the Law Enforcement Organisations! That’s right, no matter how gruesome or debased a criminal you are, you will always find employment with law enforcement. There’s always something they can’t be seen to do, something that would be illegal for them to do, or something they just need a criminal’s expertise for. Whatever it may be, always keep an eye on your back when working for the law, because at the end of the day they are still the law and you are still criminals and they won’t lose any sleep if they arrest you.

On the other hand, you might think of yourself as a righteous vigilante, going where the constables can’t and doing what they are unable to do. In that case, you could do worse than working for the law and building a strong rapport with the establishment. After all, they might arrest you, but they won’t stab a dagger into your back like criminals will. Working clandestinely for the law can be a safe and stable career, but the law never pays as well as crime do.

The four coat of arms are (from left to right): The Middelburg Constabulary, the Alfresian Intelligence Services, Inland Affairs and the Military Provost. If you want to know more about them, all of these factions are described and discussed in The Runed Age Corebook and The Ruined City Adventure Book that you can get from DriveThruRPG.

Magic Mondays

With The Ruined City released, it behoves us to make sure you are as protected as can be when out on the dangerous streets of Middelburg.

This week we give you the Swift Shining Judgement array.

Notation: Transmute Copper, Gold, Iron, Lead, Silver, Tin and Wood into Silver and put on the Silver the effect of Created Lightning.

Description: An illustrious name for a fairly simple defensive array, but seeing as there is a Lightning rune in the array it means this array is very, very new in the city of Middelburg and ostentatious names are the flavour of the month. However, credit must be given where it is due and the ostentatious name of this array certainly matches up to its effects. As with most defensive arrays, the Swift Shining Judgement transmutes whatever is about to hit you into something that can be used offensively against your attacker. In this specific case, the array transmutes a variety of materials into silver while at the same time creating lightning on that silver. This comes with a few positives and negatives.

The positives is that silver is the most conductive of all metals and so transmuting whatever is hitting you into silver means that it will only take the smallest amount of electricity to shock your opponent enough into either dropping his weapon or even completely incapacitating him. Because of this, there is no reason to put a If-Then trigger in order to build up energy. The force from whatever hits the array should be enough to both transmute the part that is hitting the array and electrify it.

The problems with this method of defence are immediate. This array is meant for hand to hand combat, since you need the array to electrocute whomever is attacking you and that won’t work if they are shooting arrows, bolts or rounds at you. The other major issue is that this array simply creates electricity, it does nothing to prevent you getting shocked. So if you want to use this array, put it on something that isn’t very conductive, like a wooden shield, or thick leather armour. As its name implies, its judgement is swift and you don’t want to accidentally get electrocuted by your own array.

Quest Giver Fridays

The Ruined City, is an excellent campaign and a great source of adventures, both randomly encountered and planned, however there are far more to the The Runed Age and the Grand City of Middelburg than just one campaign.

So for the next few weeks we will be giving you Quest Giver Fridays, where we take one of the many factions in Middelburg and adjust the Adventure Generator in the Runed Age Corebook to them to give you more varied and unique missions and jobs to do in the city.

First up this week are the Religious Organisations! Just because they are holy and (seemingly) just does not mean they avoid criminals altogether now. In fact, some of the messiest and most lethal missions you can get will be given by one priest or another. And when it’s one religion against another, then all bets are off.

There are ten prominent religious factions in Middelburg (8 eastern and 2 western as you can see by their coats of arms) and none of them particularly like each other, not even the two different Prodigalist factions. Every faction has its own unique way of doing things and unique way of worship, so each type of mission will be coloured and themed depending on which faction you get it from.

The ten coat of arms are (from left to right): Revered Prodigalists, August Prodigalists, Progenitorists, Eilanni, Mergamin, Neoists, Completists, Starchild Cultists, Runists, Pagans. If you want to know more about them, all of these factions are described and discussed in The Runed Age Corebook and The Ruined City Adventure Book that you can get from DriveThruRPG.

Magic Mondays

With The Ruined City just released, this week we are giving you a way to maximise the effects of the arrays you already have.

This week we give you the Remote Trap array-mod.

Notation: Top Array: Create Sulphur if a Human is present within the array’s field of effect and Send that Sulphur.
Bottom Array: Receive the Sulphur if Antimony is present and use it in the MAIN ARRAY.

Description: As you can hopefully see, this array is not complete; the most crucial part is missing. That is because this is not an array per se, but a mod for an array. Every single array that has ever been designed and created can be modified in an infinite number of ways, and this is merely a simple way of modifying most arrays into becoming remote activated traps. That’s correct, whether it’s a Walking Bomb or a Splinter array, you can slot any array into the big Question Mark on the Remote Trap and it will instantly become a remotely activated trap. You can even turn non-offensive arrays like the Star Flare or Angel Wings into remotely activated arrays.

Of course, things aren’t always quite so simple. First off, remember that this is a remote activated array, so if a human walks over the top array at Location A, then the array at Location B will activate. Clearly, if you just want to attack the human at Location A, you would just use an ordinary trap array. This is more for the bait-and-switch type plans or for advanced warnings of enemy actions. Remember, of course, that you can switch out the Human rune that triggers the top array for any rune that would be more appropriate to the situation. If you know a horse-drawn carriage will approach, you can use an Animal or Wood rune to trigger the array.

Also note how the Remote Trap uses sulphur and antimony, both substances which are fairly rare in any given situation. This is because you don’t want to accidentally trigger the receive array into creating your trap/utility array’s effects prematurely. Again, these runes can be switched for others, but keep in mind to use materials and substances rare to the situation you find yourself in.

Lastly, the sulphur that the bottom array receives must be used in some form or fashion, even if only as an If-Then trigger, so modify your Main Array appropriately. You can of course also transmute this sulphur into whatever it is your Main Array is doing and it will save you some energy.